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# Besides what we have seen in (L) and (N1), there are many ways to get simply bar and
# circular charts:
 
    
  
 
da = c(237.5,137.5,125); co = c("red","yellow","blue")
StripNames = c("A","B","C"); StripC(da,co)           # (1)
BarNames = c("A","B","C"); BarC(da,co)               # (2)
noGrid=1; BarNames = c("A","B","C"); BarC(da,co)     # (3)
PIE2C( da, c("grey50", "grey75", "grey95") )         # (4)
PieC( da, c("grey50", "grey75", "grey95") )          # (5)
PIE_( da, 4 )                                        # (6)
Pie_C( da,co, 27)                                    # (7)
Pie2( da )                                           # (8)
PIE2( da )           # as (8) without grid [as PIE_(da,1)]
 
      
# While Pie, PIE, PIEh, Bar, BAR, Strip, PIE_, PIE2 automatically chooses the colors, # with PieC, PIEC, PIEH, BarC, BARC, StripC you can add colors # In addition to PIE2C (4), Pie2C automatically adds letters. # For simplicity, names are automatically assigned to the circular charts. If I have to # distinguish different charts I can give them different names with commands PIE_C, # Pie_C, PIE_, Pie_, similar to commands with 2 instead of _, to which I add, after a # comma, a number that indicates the name of the first sector: letters A, B, ..., Z are # indicated by numbers 1,2, ..., 26, letters a, b, ..., z by numbers 27,28, ..., 52. # If you type DimCa <<- n with n < 1 and (instead of BARC and BarC) you use BARCC and # BarCC, you can write the BarNames with smaller dimension. # You can also indicate a single color: BarNames = c("A","B","C"); BarC(da,"yellow") BarNames = c("A","B","C"); BARC(da,"yellow") # data: 237.5 137.5 125 # %: 47.5 27.5 25 Other examples of use